Wednesday, June 30, 2010

27 weeks today :)




How your baby's growing:
This week, your baby weighs almost 2 pounds (like a head of cauliflower) and is about 14 1/2 inches long with her legs extended. She's sleeping and waking at regular intervals, opening and closing her eyes, and perhaps even sucking her fingers. With more brain tissue developing, your baby's brain is very active now. While her lungs are still immature, they would be capable of functioning — with a lot of medical help — if she were to be born now. Chalk up any tiny rhythmic movements you may be feeling to a case of baby hiccups, which may be common from now on. Each episode usually lasts only a few moments, and they don't bother her, so just relax and enjoy the tickle.

The second trimester is drawing to a close, but as your body gears up for the final lap, you may start noticing some new symptoms. Along with an aching back, for example, you may find that your leg muscles cramp up now and then. They're carrying extra weight, after all, and your expanding uterus is putting pressure on the veins that return blood from your legs to your heart as well as on the nerves leading from your trunk to your legs. Unfortunately, the cramps may get worse as your pregnancy progresses. Leg cramps are more common at night but can also happen during the day. When a cramp strikes, stretching the calf muscle should give you some relief. Straighten your leg and then gently flex your toes back toward your shin. Walking for a few minutes or massaging your calf sometimes helps, too.

It may be the furthest thing from your mind right now, but it's not too soon to think about family planning. You'll want to have made some decisions about postpartum birth control before your baby arrives. If you're considering a tubal ligation, be aware that most states require you to sign a consent form at least 30 days beforehand. So if you'd like the option of having the surgery during your postpartum hospital stay, don't wait too much longer to discuss it with your caregiver. (You can still change your mind later.)

Beyond orange juice "Need more vitamin C? Try red bell peppers! They have nearly twice the vitamin C of a navel orange, and a half cup is one of the five servings of fruits and vegetables you need each day." — Kayla B.


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Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Baby Shower Invites

Mom just ordered the baby shower invites!! Should be coming in soon :) Bro. Frost will announce it as it gets closer so we were going to send these to all out of towners... I want to send them to everyone at church but with all our friends it will get expessive!


Front




Back

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Sunday, June 27, 2010

Rick & Me
~June 2010~ 26 wks along :)


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Thursday, June 24, 2010

Auria's Bows just arrived :)

I ordered some bows for my lil girl ...they have a lil clip to attach them to a headband. I have croche headbands in different colors on their way. I can mix/match them with her outfits...


*pink double ruffle bow




*Black double ruffle bow



* Red ruffle bow




* Small fabric bows! They r so tiny! Hope they look ok attached to a headband, if not i might just wear them in my hair..LOL :)




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Wednesday, June 23, 2010

26 wks Today :)




Your pregnancy: 26 wks

How your baby's growing:
The network of nerves in your baby's ears is better developed and more sensitive than before. She may now be able to hear both your voice and your partner's as you chat with each other. She's inhaling and exhaling small amounts of amniotic fluid, which is essential for the development of her lungs. These so-called breathing movements are also good practice for when she's born and takes that first gulp of air. And she's continuing to put on baby fat. She now weighs about a pound and two-thirds and measures 14 inches (an English hothouse cucumber) from head to heel.


Note: Every baby develops a little differently — even in the womb. Our information is designed to give you a general idea of your baby's development.

How your life's changing:
Are you rushing around trying to get to childbirth classes and prepare your baby's room while still taking care of all your other daily tasks? Make sure that you also continue to eat well and get plenty of rest. Around this time, your blood pressure may be increasing slightly, although it's probably still lower than it was before you got pregnant. (Typically, blood pressure falls toward the end of the first trimester, and it tends to reach a low at about 22 to 24 weeks.)

Preeclampsia — a serious disorder characterized by high blood pressure and protein in your urine — most often shows up after 37 weeks, but it can happen earlier so it's important to be aware of the warning signs of this condition. Call your caregiver if you have swelling in your face or puffiness around your eyes, more than slight swelling of your hands, excessive or sudden swelling of your feet or ankles, or rapid weight gain (more than 4 pounds in a week). With more severe preeclampsia, you may experience other symptoms. Let your caregiver know immediately if you have a severe or persistent headache, vision changes (including double or blurred vision, seeing spots or flashing lights, sensitivity to light, or temporary loss of vision), intense pain or tenderness in your upper abdomen, or vomiting.

If your lower back seems a little achy lately, you can thank both your growing uterus — which shifts your center of gravity, stretches out and weakens your abdominal muscles, and may be pressing on a nerve — as well as hormonal changes that loosen your joints and ligaments. Plus, the extra weight you're carrying means more work for your muscles and increased stress on your joints, which is why you may feel worse at the end of the day. Walking, standing, or sitting for long periods, as well as bending and lifting can all put a strain on your back. A warm bath or hot compress might bring relief. (Some women, though, find cool compresses more comforting.) Try to maintain good posture during the day, avoid activities that require bending and twisting at the same time, take frequent breaks when sitting or standing, and sleep on your side with one or both knees bent with a pillow between your legs, using another pillow (or wedge) to support your abdomen.













Create a Birth Announcement



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Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Colors of bedding for crib :)

I think i have already posted this picture but it will kinda give ya an idea of what in doing her room in. I'll post pictures of the whole room when it's finished :)


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Auria's Room




So, I got into a creative mood last night and this is what I came up with for one of the walls in her room ...what do you think !?!
I still have to paint the crib black and it will match the bedding :)


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Monday, June 21, 2010

A few lil outfits iv got for Auria :)

Just can't help myself!! Everything is just too cute :) AND on " SALE" ;)


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A few things lil outfits iv got for Auria :)

Just a few things I seen and couldn't pass up!! This better be a lil girl inside me or I not have nice words to say to the ultrasound lady! Just Kiddin' ;)


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Wednesday, June 16, 2010

25 weeks today =]

I wanted to b comfy today...thought it was going another hot one here in Btown but God has blessed us with a beauitful breezy day!!! =]


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25 weeks still 6 months along







You're 25 weeks pregnant!!

Got a dark line running down your belly? That's your linea nigra, and it's totally normal. Pregnancy hormones might also be making your complexion a little spotty. Switching to oil-free, water-based, noncomedogenic makeup should help clear things up.
Your Baby's now the size of an eggplant!
That oh-so-handy sense of equilibrium is kicking in, and baby's learning to distinguish right side up from upside down.

How your baby's growing
Head to heels, your baby now measures about 13 1/2 inches. Her weight — a pound and a half. she's beginning to exchange her long, lean look for some baby fat. As she does, her wrinkled skin will begin to smooth out and she'll start to look more and more like a newborn. She's also growing more hair — and if you could see it, you'd now be able to discern its color and texture.


Note: Every baby develops a little differently — even in the womb. Our information is designed to give you a general idea of your baby's development.

Your baby's not the only one with more hair — your locks may look more full and lustrous than ever. It's not that you're growing more hair, but thanks to hormonal changes, the hair that you'd normally shed is sticking around longer than usual. Enjoy the fullness while you can — the extra hair will fall out after you give birth.

You may also notice that you can't move around as gracefully as before. Unless your caregiver has advised you otherwise, it's fine to continue to exercise, but follow a few safety rules: Don't work out when you're feeling overly tired and stop if you feel any pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath. Don't lie flat on your back and avoid contact sports as well as any exercise where you're apt to lose your balance. Be sure to drink plenty of water, and make time for both warm-up and cool-down periods.

When you have your glucose-screening test at 24 to 28 weeks, a second tube of blood may be taken at the same time to check for anemia. If blood tests show that you have iron-deficiency anemia (the most common type of anemia), your caregiver will probably recommend that you take an iron supplement.



Constipation cure: "To ease constipation, add oat or wheat bran to anything you can think of — cereal, yogurt, smoothies, or even spaghetti sauce." — Kristin

3 Questions About...Third trimester prenatal care

Q1.
How often will I see my caregiver in the third trimester?

Between 28 and 36 weeks, you'll see your caregiver every two weeks. One month before your due date, this will increase to once a week.

Q2.
What will she do at each appointment?

• Ask how you're feeling physically and emotionally and follow up on any issues raised at your last appointment. Among other things, she'll want to know if you're having contractions, vaginal bleeding, or unusual discharge; if you're having headaches; and if you're feeling anxious or depressed. Let her know if you have any symptoms that haven't been addressed.

• Ask about your baby's movements. She'll remind you to call if you sense that your baby has gotten less active. At some point, she may ask you to start counting your baby's movements for a set period of time each day.

• Weigh you and check your urine for signs of preeclampsia, urinary tract infections, and other problems. Take your blood pressure and check your ankles, hands, and face for swelling.

• Check your baby's heartbeat and do an abdominal exam to estimate your baby's size and position. She'll measure the distance between your pubic bone and the top of your uterus to see if your baby's growth rate seems normal.

• Possibly check your cervix. Don't expect a pelvic exam at every visit. Many caregivers don't do one unless they have a specific concern, such as preterm labor. Once you pass your due date, your provider will check your cervix to help decide whether (or when) to induce your labor.

• Tell you what to watch out for. She'll tell you about the signs of preterm labor and preeclampsia, and review other warning signs that should prompt a call. As your due date nears, she'll discuss the signs of labor and let you know when you should get in touch with her.

• Go over your labor and delivery questions. Make a list with your partner and bring it to a prenatal visit.

• Discuss postpartum decisions like whether you plan to breastfeed or circumcise your son. She'll also discuss your options for postpartum contraception. If you haven't found a doctor for your baby, your caregiver can give you some names.

Q3.
What tests are coming up?

Depending on your situation you may be offered:

• Hematocrit/hemoglobin: This blood test for anemia is usually repeated during the third trimester. (If you were tested when you took your glucose challenge test and the results were normal, it might not be repeated.)

• Gestational diabetes testing: If you have a normal glucose screening test between 24 and 28 weeks, consider yourself done. But if your screening results are abnormal and you haven't yet done the glucose tolerance test, you'll be tested now.

• Rh antibody screening: If you're Rh-negative, the antibody screen will be repeated (usually at the same time as your glucose challenge test) and you'll get an injection of Rh immune globulin at 28 weeks. In the unlikely case that some of your baby's blood gets into your bloodstream, the Rh immune globulin will protect you from developing antibodies that could pose a risk to future babies or even this one. (Note: if your baby's father takes a blood test and is found to be Rh-negative like you, you'll know that your baby is also Rh-negative so you won't need the Rh immune globulin.)

• Group B strep test: Between 35 and 37 weeks, you'll be checked for group B streptococci (GBS) in your vagina and rectum. You won't be treated right away if the cultures are positive, because early treatment is no guarantee that the bacteria won't return. Instead, you'll be treated with IV antibiotics when you're in labor. (If you've previously given birth to a baby who had GBS, you can skip this test because you'll be given antibiotics in labor no matter what.)

• Biophysical profiles and nonstress tests: If you have certain pregnancy complications or you've passed your due date, these tests will be ordered to check on your baby.

This Week's Activity

Dedicate time to your partner this week. Treat your partner to a romantic surprise. Write down all the things you love about him, tell him why you think he'll be a great dad, or just go for a stroll while holding hands. Take time to connect on a physical and emotional level and celebrate what connects you and makes you love one another. Try to do something at least once a week that clearly communicates the importance of your partner in your life, says clinical psychologist Diane Sanford.

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Sunday, June 13, 2010

Me 6months along =]




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24 weeks (6months) last Wednesday ...srry so late to update!!




How your baby's growing:
Your baby's growing steadily, having gained about 4 ounces since last week. That puts her at just over a pound. Since she's almost a foot long (picture an ear of corn), she cuts a pretty lean figure at this point, but her body is filling out proportionally and she'll soon start to plump up. Her brain is also growing quickly now, and her taste buds are continuing to develop. Her lungs are developing "branches" of the respiratory "tree" as well as cells that produce surfactant, a substance that will help her air sacs inflate once she hits the outside world. Her skin is still thin and translucent, but that will start to change soon.

See what your baby looks like this week. (Or see what fraternal twins look like in the womb this week.)

Note: Every baby develops a little differently — even in the womb. Our information is designed to weight during pregnancy?
In the past few weeks, the top of your uterus has risen above your belly button and is now about the size of a soccer ball.

Most women have a glucose screening test (also called a glucose challenge test or GCT) between now and 28 weeks. This test checks for gestational diabetes, a pregnancy-related high-blood-sugar condition. Untreated diabetes increases your risk of having a difficult vaginal delivery or needing a cesarean section because it causes your baby to grow too large, especially in his upper body. It also raises your baby's odds for other complications like low blood sugar right after birth. A positive result on your GCT doesn't mean you have gestational diabetes, but it does mean that you'll need to take the glucose tolerance test (GTT) to find out for sure.

Finally, if you don't already know how to spot the signs of preterm labor, now's the time to learn. Contact your caregiver immediately if you notice any of the signs mentioned below.

Relief for finger pain "To relieve finger pain and swelling, I keep a cold pack in the freezer. I apply it to my hands several times a day." — Kate

3 Questions About...Preterm labor

More than 12 percent of babies in the United States are born prematurely (before 37 weeks). About a quarter of these births are intentional, meaning that the medical team decides to induce labor early or perform a c-section because of a serious medical condition such as severe or worsening preeclampsia or because the baby has stopped growing. The rest are known as spontaneous preterm births. You may end up having a spontaneous preterm birth if prior to 37 weeks you go into labor, your water breaks, or your cervix dilates with no contractions.

While there are some known risk factors for preterm labor, such as having certain genital tract infections, placental problems, or cervical insufficiency, in many cases no one knows what causes a woman to go into labor before term. So it's important for all pregnant women to learn the signs of premature labor and what to do if it happens to you.

Q1.
What are the signs of preterm labor?

Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms before 37 weeks:
• An increase in vaginal discharge
• A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood)
• Any vaginal bleeding or spotting
• Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt)
• An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down)
• Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain

These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies too, and early contractions may just be harmless Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual.

Q2.
What should I do if I think I'm going into labor prematurely?

If you have signs of preterm labor or think you're leaking amniotic fluid, call your practitioner, who'll likely have you go to the hospital for further assessment. Once there, your medical team will monitor your contractions, watch your baby's heart rate, and test your urine for signs of infection. A doctor or midwife will do a speculum exam to see whether your membranes have ruptured. She may swab your cervix and vagina and send one sample to the lab to check for an infection and another for a fetal fibronectin (fFN) test. This test analyzes your cervical and vaginal fluid for the presence of a protein that helps bind the amniotic sac to the lining of your uterus. Between 24 and 34 weeks, elevated levels of fFN mean that this "glue" is disintegrating ahead of schedule (due to contractions or injury to the amniotic sac). A negative result means that it's highly unlikely that you'll give birth in the next week or two, which can set your mind at ease and allow your practitioner to hold off on treatments that may prove to be unnecessary.

Q3.
Will my baby be okay if he's born early?

The closer your baby is to full term at birth, the more likely he is to survive and the less likely he is to have health problems. Premature babies born between 34 and 37 weeks generally do fine, although they are still at higher risk for short- and long-term problems compared to babies born full term. On the other end of the continuum are babies who are extremely premature: These days, some babies born as early as 24 weeks (or even a bit earlier) may survive thanks to advances in neonatal care, but these extremely preterm infants require significant medical interventions and long stays in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), and the survivors often have serious long-term problems.

The best thing you can do to reduce your risk of preterm birth is to avoid known dangers to your baby like smoking, drinking, and illicit drug use. Eat a nutritious diet, keep all of your prenatal appointments, and report any symptoms or problems to your caregiver promptly.

This Week's Activity:


Tackle your home improvement projects. Sit down with your partner and take stock of the things you'd like to fix around the house before your little one arrives. Then let your partner handle them. (You shouldn't be exposing yourself to chemicals or getting up on ladders.) Some things for the list:

• Install or check smoke detectors, get a fire extinguisher for each floor of your house, and plan a fire escape route.

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

23 Weeks =D




How your baby's growing:
Turn on the radio and sway to the music. With her sense of movement well developed by now, your baby can feel you dance. And now that she's more than 11 inches long and weighs just over a pound (about as much as a large mango), you may be able to see her squirm underneath your clothes. Blood vessels in her lungs are developing to prepare for breathing, and the sounds that your baby's increasingly keen ears pick up are preparing her for entry into the outside world. Loud noises that become familiar now

-You may notice that your ankles and feet start to swell a bit in the coming weeks or months, especially at the end of the day or during the heat of summer. Sluggish circulation in your legs — coupled with changes in your blood chemistry that may cause some water retention — may result in swelling, also known as edema. Your body will get rid of the extra fluid after you have your baby, which is why you'll pee frequently and sweat a lot for a few days after delivery. In the meantime, lie on your left side or put your feet up when you can, stretch out your legs when you sit, and avoid sitting — or standing — in one place for long periods. Also, try to exercise regularly to increase circulation, and wear support stockings (put them on first thing in the morning) and roomy, comfortable shoes. You may be tempted to skimp on liquids to combat swelling, but you need to drink plenty of water because staying hydrated actually helps prevent fluid retention. While a certain amount of edema in your lower extremities is normal during pregnancy, excessive swelling may be a sign of a serious condition called preeclampsia. Be sure to call your midwife or doctor if you have severe or sudden swelling of your feet or ankles, more than slight swelling of your hands, swelling in your face, or puffiness around your eyes.

Exercise helps you sleep "When I started having trouble sleeping during my pregnancy, I asked my friends what to do. One suggested I take a half-hour walk during the day. It really helped me sleep better, and it felt great to have a little time for myself."








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